KEY LEARNING FROM THE UN COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN 62ND SESSION

UN Commission on the Status of Women Sixty-Second Session

Attending the 62nd session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, which took place at the UN Headquarters in New York from 12 to 23 March 2018 accorded me lots of information on the strides and challenges the world has made in the journey towards empowering women. Key learning that I took away from my participation in sessions include emerging issues and trends.

Emerging issues that I observed include more actions on assertiveness on issues related to girls’ education, domestic violence and a more vigorous drive towards women entrepreneurship. There is a greater focus on women owning their own businesses and enterprise rather than aiming at rising to leadership positions in corporations owned or dominated by men. Empowerment of women and girls is now moving towards being their own bosses and building their own conglomerate, small businesses. As a speaker said “We have to co-elevate, not co-exist” Dr. Leticia Appiah, ED, National population Council, Ghana. In the assertiveness and resistance to domestic violence, the percentage of reportage of violence by women and girls in Guyana has risen to 58% according to Stronger Hearts Native Helpline.

For economic empowerment of women and girls, the focus should be:
  • Encouraging more ownership of business and enterprise
  • More assertiveness in resisting violence
  • Creating diversified streams of income
  • Women should be ladders for other women, helping them to reach greater heights.
  • Exploring more of mentorship approach because mentorship is a good way to exchange values.
This quotation by Felicia Twumasi (CEO, Home Foods Processing and Cannery, Ghana) resonated with me:

“YOU CAN LEARN ANYTHING YOU WANT TO, INCLUDING SUCCESS”


   


Rabia S. Sa'id, PhD
  • Associate Professor of Physics
    Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria
  • Personal Website: http://www.rabiasaid.org
  • Email: rabia at rabiasaid.org
    Please remember to use the correct format of email, with the @ sign and no spaces. It was written this way to prevent those nasty spambots from harvesting the email address.
  • Ford Foundation International Fellow (2002)
  • Fellow of the African Scientific Institute (2013)
  • OWSD/ Elsevier Foundation Award in Physics (2015)

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