Posts

American Generosity

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  I am delighted to give an account of what I have witnessed about American generosity. Introduction My first visit to the United States was in July 2003. I was visiting a Nigerian friend to spend the summer holidays with her in New Jersey, where she stayed with another Nigerian friend. During my one monyth stay from 1st through to the 31st July, we visited only diaspora Nigerians, so I did not meet Americans from per se. The generosity during that time was, therefore, taken for granted as the kind of generosity I would expect from Nigerians. My second visit in 2005 for another holiday with friends from New York to Denver to Las Vegas was pretty much the same, spending time with Nigerian Green Card holders. My third visit was in 2015, and I was coming to America to receive an award at the annual conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in San Jose, California. It was a short visit; just five days. An all-expense-paid trip and staying in a hotel with

I am happy, if you are: The concept of Ubuntu

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Big Sur, California 9 July 2020 (photo credit: Janet Barnes) One of my favourite African concepts has always been the concept of UBUNTU since I came across it in the late 90s. I have always tried my best to live by this concept and it is my belief that if everyone lived by it, the world would be a better place. So, today, I came across this post on a friend's Facebook wall and I thought to share again here. A Surprising Lesson on Happiness From an African Tribe:-: Let me tell you a story… There was an anthropologist who had been studying the habits and culture of a remote African tribe. He had been working in the village for quite some time and the day before he was to return home, he put together a gift basket filled with delicious fruits from around the region and wrapped it in a ribbon. He placed the basket under a tree and then he gathered up the children in the village. The man drew a line in the dirt, looked at the children, and said, “When I tell you to start, run

Gender Champions in Nuclear Policy 2019 Impact Report Launch

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On May 28, as a Visiting Fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at Monterey, I was privileged to participate in a very educative webinar, which showcased the work of certain passionate champions seeking to improve and increase the roles of women in nuclear policy and decisions.  Nuclear policy issues has tended to be a male dominated arena, with mainly only males at the table. Champions make commitments such as not participating in any single gender committee, board, organizations or initiatives. Watch the launch of the Gender Champions in Nuclear Policy (GCNP) 2019 Impact Report, measuring progress made during its first year in advancing gender equity in the nuclear policy field. Moderated by GCNP Co-Founder and Ploughshares Fund's Michelle Dover, this panel includes GCNP Co-Founder Laura Holgate, NTI Co-Chair Ernest J. Moniz, Ploughshares Fund President Joe Cirincione, and NTI Program Officer Jack Brosnan. Read the full report here: https://b

A very interesting and educative webinar

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Introduction The Corona Virus and its associated Covid19 disease has turned the world upside down and we may never be the same again. Many of our resolutions for the year 2020 had to be put on hold. Travel, visits, vacations, all shelved for shelter-in-place and lockdown. Many a businesses may never recover. We have had to find new ways to meet online, virtually. Real life heroes:the frontlines in the health industry have had to put their life on the line and many lost their lives. We salute them, we wish the departed souls eternal rest. However, life must go on and we found new ways of keeping the conversations going across countries and boundaries. So today, 7th May 2020, I joined a very interesting webinar titled:  Global Order Amidst Global Disorder . The webinar was jointly hosted by the Tällberg Foundation and The School of Global Affairs and Public Policy (GAPP) at The American University in Cairo.  The introduction to the webinar invite states: 

Historical Walking Tour of Monterey, Friday 21st February, 2020.

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Hi again everyone, As promised, I am sharing some activities of my stay at Monterrey, starting with the fun part this Friday, 21 February, 2020 😃 Although the morning of Friday saw us taking a very important lecture from Dr. Nikolai Sokov via Zoom from the Vienna Center for Disarmament and nonproliferation, nonetheless, we were able to go on a historic tour of Monterrey as part of the course on cultural exchange. The magical tour is conducted by a wonderful lady, Ms. Monica Hudson (https://www.calegacytours.com). We met in front of the CNS Building and had a two hours magical tour from 12-2.00 pm. The historic tour is better told in pictures and that is what I will be doing here. Start of the tour, meet up in front of the CNS building. Left to right, Monica, Anastasia N, Anastasia B, Rabia, Hanna and Ozge. Photo speak: Someone is photo bombing 😂 Entrance to the Old Whaling Station The cobblestone entrance to the W

Returning to the Notes After a Long Hiatus

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HAPPY 2020! Procrastination, Procrastination, that lethargy I wrote about a while ago caught up with me and I have not been able to write anything for my blog. It was not all lethargy though, I was quite busy with my students, both undergraduates, and postgraduates, committee memberships in several boards at my university. So, I would like to tell you about a few positives and good news that happened at the tail end of the year 2019. I was confirmed as a full Professor of Physics by the council of my university on the 20th of December, 2019 and at the same time appointed as a Deputy Director of Partnerships in the Directorate of Research, Innovation and Partnerships of my university. That set the pace for entry into the New Year with much better news. Firstly, I had the honor of being selected as a Visiting Fellow on a US exchange Scholar Program at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies of the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, Californi

Sub-Saharan Africa's Low Life Expectancy (2017): Nigeria is the Third Worst Case

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Are We All Dying Off in Africa? Last week as I pondered on the number of deaths of young and middle-aged Nigerians who were below or around 50 years that I have become aware of, I began to wonder about life expectancy in Nigeria. The deaths that aroused my curiosity have cut across people of both genders and all walks of life and of various educational and income levels. It has also cut across all the regions of Nigeria with only slight regional variations. I worried that Nigerians of all categories were dying young. Then as I discussed my concern with a friend who normally sees everything in numbers, we brooded over the overall life expectancy of Sub-Saharan African countries. We wondered about what the trend of those life expectancy numbers would look like and what it may portend for our survival as a people. We believed that life expectancy was going down in Africa. Of course, this was a widespread opinion. So, we were worried that if our life expectancy was going down, Sub-